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PostgreSQL is a part of default CentOS repositories, so yum can be used to install it.

Followings are the steps to install PostgreSQL on CentOS 7.

Install PostgeSQL server by yum

sudo yum install postgresql-server postgresql-contrib


Initialize the Database

sudo postgresql-setup initdb


Start the Database

sudo systemctl start postgresql


Enable PostgreSQL

sudo systemctl enable postgresql


Open by sudo vi /var/lib/pgsql/data/postgresql.conf and modify its part like below:

listen_addresses = '*'                  # defaults to 'localhost'; use '*' for all
port = 5432                             # uncomment as long as you want to connect by socket


Modify configuration by sudo vi /var/lib/pgsql/data/pg_hba.conf - you need to uncomment all the host files and add below line

host    all             all             0.0.0.0/0               password

Please refer below I use in my server

# PostgreSQL Client Authentication Configuration File
# ===================================================
#
# Refer to the "Client Authentication" section in the PostgreSQL
# documentation for a complete description of this file.  A short
# synopsis follows.
#
# This file controls: which hosts are allowed to connect, how clients
# are authenticated, which PostgreSQL user names they can use, which
# databases they can access.  Records take one of these forms:
#
# local      DATABASE  USER  METHOD  [OPTIONS]
# host       DATABASE  USER  ADDRESS  METHOD  [OPTIONS]
# hostssl    DATABASE  USER  ADDRESS  METHOD  [OPTIONS]
# hostnossl  DATABASE  USER  ADDRESS  METHOD  [OPTIONS]
#
# (The uppercase items must be replaced by actual values.)
#
# The first field is the connection type: "local" is a Unix-domain
# socket, "host" is either a plain or SSL-encrypted TCP/IP socket,
# "hostssl" is an SSL-encrypted TCP/IP socket, and "hostnossl" is a
# plain TCP/IP socket.
#
# DATABASE can be "all", "sameuser", "samerole", "replication", a
# database name, or a comma-separated list thereof. The "all"
# keyword does not match "replication". Access to replication
# must be enabled in a separate record (see example below).
#
# USER can be "all", a user name, a group name prefixed with "+", or a
# comma-separated list thereof.  In both the DATABASE and USER fields
# you can also write a file name prefixed with "@" to include names
# from a separate file.
#
# ADDRESS specifies the set of hosts the record matches.  It can be a
# host name, or it is made up of an IP address and a CIDR mask that is
# an integer (between 0 and 32 (IPv4) or 128 (IPv6) inclusive) that
# specifies the number of significant bits in the mask.  A host name
# that starts with a dot (.) matches a suffix of the actual host name.
# Alternatively, you can write an IP address and netmask in separate
# columns to specify the set of hosts.  Instead of a CIDR-address, you
# can write "samehost" to match any of the server's own IP addresses,
# or "samenet" to match any address in any subnet that the server is
# directly connected to.
#
# METHOD can be "trust", "reject", "md5", "password", "gss", "sspi",
# "krb5", "ident", "peer", "pam", "ldap", "radius" or "cert".  Note that
# "password" sends passwords in clear text; "md5" is preferred since
# it sends encrypted passwords.
#
# OPTIONS are a set of options for the authentication in the format
# NAME=VALUE.  The available options depend on the different
# authentication methods -- refer to the "Client Authentication"
# section in the documentation for a list of which options are
# available for which authentication methods.
#
# Database and user names containing spaces, commas, quotes and other
# special characters must be quoted.  Quoting one of the keywords
# "all", "sameuser", "samerole" or "replication" makes the name lose
# its special character, and just match a database or username with
# that name.
#
# This file is read on server startup and when the postmaster receives
# a SIGHUP signal.  If you edit the file on a running system, you have
# to SIGHUP the postmaster for the changes to take effect.  You can
# use "pg_ctl reload" to do that.

# Put your actual configuration here
# ----------------------------------
#
# If you want to allow non-local connections, you need to add more
# "host" records.  In that case you will also need to make PostgreSQL
# listen on a non-local interface via the listen_addresses
# configuration parameter, or via the -i or -h command line switches.



# TYPE  DATABASE        USER            ADDRESS                 METHOD

# "local" is for Unix domain socket connections only
#local   all             all                                     peer
# IPv4 local connections:
#host    all             all             127.0.0.1/32            ident
#host    all             all             127.0.0.1/32            truest
# IPv6 local connections:
#host    all             all             ::1/128                 ident
#host    all             all             ::1/128                 trust
# Allow replication connections from localhost, by a user with the
# replication privilege.
#local   replication     postgres                                peer
#host    replication     postgres        127.0.0.1/32            ident
#host    replication     postgres        ::1/128                 ident
host    all             all             0.0.0.0/0               password


Once you changed above, you need to restart your server to make it happen.


PostgreSQL basic setup

The first action you should do is changing password for postgres

sudo passwd postgres



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